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Wednesday, 11 December 2019

8:00 AM — 2:00 PM

Registration

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

8:00 — 9:00 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

9:00 — 9:05 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Salon AB

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Bill Mongelluzzo

9:05 — 9:45 AM

Day 2 Keynote Address

Location: Salon AB

At least three models for marine terminal automation have emerged. The full automation model in Europe and at Long Beach Container Terminal and TraPac in Southern California incorporates autonomous horizontal ground transportation, automated stacking cranes (ASCs) in the yard, and automation at the on-dock rail facility. Semiautomated terminals in New York-New Jersey and Virginia also incorporate ASCs in the yards, but the East Coast terminals deploy traditional yard tractors driven by longshore labor to shuttle containers within the yards. APM Terminals’ Pier 400 facility in Los Angeles this year will roll out the automated straddle carrier model already in use in Australia. Each model presents different challenges and comes at a different cost for terminal operators. This Day 2 keynote address by Mark Sisson, who leads the marine analysis group at consulting firm AECOM, will discuss the operational and cost differences inherent in these automation models.

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Bill Mongelluzzo

Associate Vice President, Transportation Planner
and Analyst,
AECOM

Keynote Speaker

Mark A. Sisson, PE

9:45 — 10:30 AM

Marine Terminal Automation:
The Southern California Model

Location: Salon AB

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

President,

ILWU Local 63

Panelist

Joe Gasperov

President,
Long Beach Container Terminal

Panelist

Anthony Otto

Long Beach Container Terminal and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union have worked together for the past 10 years on development of the fully automated Middle Harbor terminal. LBCT Middle Harbor, with an annual throughput capacity of more than 3 million TEU, efficiently handles some of the largest container ships calling in North America. ILWU dockworkers maintain high productivity, including among the top truck turnaround times among the 12 container terminals in Los Angeles-Long Beach. In this important employer-labor discussion, Joe Gasperov and Anthony Otto will explain how employer-dockworker collaboration since the genesis of the project 10 years ago resulted in a seamless transition from manual to automated operations.

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

11:00 AM — 12:00 PM

Vancouver:
Enhancing Productivity at Canada’s Largest Port

Location: Salon AB

The Port of Vancouver’s innovative extended-gates and truck reservation system, which has made the port a leader in truck turn times on the West Coast of North America, and the measures it has taken to reduce container dwell times at its rail facilities, have returned fluidity to Canada’s largest container port after a grueling 2017-2018 winter. Working with port stakeholders as well as provincial and federal government agencies, Vancouver has set a new standard for North American ports in container yard innovation, development of rail and road connectors, and providing better visibility via technology. In a clear-eyed assessment of the challenges ahead, port stakeholders will explain how they’re making better use of the tools at their disposal, providing actionable insights for other stakeholders as the gateway bumps up against the limits of existing terminal capacity.

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

President and CEO,
BC Trucking Association

Panelist

David Earle

Vice President,
Sales and Marketing
GCT Canada

Panelist

Chris Ng

Vice President,

Sales and Marketing,

Intermodal and Automotive, Canadian Pacific

Panelist

Jonathan Wahba

12:00 — 1:00 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Salon CD

1:00 — 2:00 PM

Landlord Ports and the Pursuit of Cargo Fluidity

Location: Salon AB

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Hugh Morley

Owner,
Best Transportation

Panelist

Tom Heimgartner

President and CEO,
Harbor Trucking Association

Panelist

Weston LaBar

Director,
Port Department,
Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey

Panelist

Sam Ruda

Executive Director,
Port of Los Angeles

Panelist

Gene Seroka

Los Angeles-Long Beach and New York-New Jersey, the two largest North American ports, face unique challenges in the era of mega-ships. Because New York and Los Angeles also serve the two largest population centers, carriers discharge and reload 65 to 85 percent of each vessel’s containers, generating cargo surges in excess of 10,000 containers during the average call. These ports experience a “peak” season every week as their terminal operators attempt to prevent their facilities from being overwhelmed by the cargo surges. The ports are working closely with terminals, carriers, truckers, railroads, and equipment providers to develop creative cargo-handling processes to ease bottlenecks and increase cargo velocity. Because these landlord ports don’t operate the terminals, however, what measures can they implement to facilitate private-sector initiatives? New York-New Jersey is working with its tenants on extended-gate programs and establishing dedicated lanes for rail cargo. Los Angeles is working with terminal operators to relocate chassis to near-dock storage yards, establish a portwide reservation system for truckers and an information portal to share advance data on shipments as much as 14 days before vessels arrive in port. What lessons can other landlord ports in North America learn from New York-New Jersey and Los Angeles-Long Beach?

2:00 — 3:00 PM

The Shipper Perspective of Port Productivity:
A Roundtable Discussion With BCOs

Location: Salon AB

Executive Editor, JOC.com
and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Director,

Global Logistics,

Big Lots Stores

Panelist

Robert Fredman

Director,

Global Logistics,

Ansell

Panelist

Andrew Gillespie

Managing Director,
Wine and Spirits
Shippers Association

Panelist

Alison Leavitt

Importers and exporters don’t have direct business relationships with ports and terminal operators, but they depend on the seamless hand-off of containers between marine terminals and transportation vendors for on-time delivery of their freight. In the past, most BCOs never set foot on a marine terminal. Now they realize that building relationships with the terminal operators is just as important as the relationships they have developed with their transportation carriers and third-party logistics providers. In this concluding session at the 2020 Port Performance North America Conference, a panel of BCOs will discuss the key initiatives underway at ports and marine terminals, the state of labor-management relations, and what’s working and what isn’t, and how their relationships with ports and terminal operators are changing — and why.

3:00 — 3:15 PM

Closing Remarks with Awards

Location: Salon AB

Based on JOC Port Productivity data, JOC Events will recognize the top three North American ports and top three terminals in overall port productivity in 2018 and those whose port productivity improved the most from 2017.

Top Ports — Overall Productivity, 2018:

No. 1 Small Port: Port of Wilmington, N.C.

No. 1 Midsize Port: Port of Charleston

No. 1 Large Port: Port of Savannah

Top Terminals — Overall Productivity, 2018:

No. 1 Small Terminal: Wilmington, N.C., North Carolina Ports Authority

No. 1 Midsize Terminal: Wando Welch, South Carolina Ports Authority

No. 1 Large Terminal: Garden City, Georgia Ports Authority

 

Most Improved Ports From 2017:

Alabama State Port Authority/Mobile

Jacksonville Port Authority

Port of New Orleans

 

Most Improved Terminals From 2017:

Everport Container Terminal, Los Angeles, Everport Terminal Services

Choctaw Point, Mobile, APM Terminals

Pierce County Terminal, Northwest Seaport Alliance, Everport Terminal Services

3:30 — 5:30 PM

JOC Shipper Roundtable

Location: Elizabeth Salon D

BY RESERVATION ONLY FOR BCOs

This exclusive, shipper-only discussion facilitated by JOC.com Executive Editor Mark Szakonyi and Senior Editor Bill Mongelluzzo will bring together beneficial cargo owners in an off-the-record meeting to exchange ideas and potential solutions to the numerous challenges confronting supply chain stakeholders. Among the topics of discussion will be port and terminal efficiency, the impact of ocean carrier consolidation, mega-vessels and new alliances, new and upcoming regulatory requirements, and market and pricing trends.

You must be a BCO/Shipper (you must own the goods that are being shipped) in order to take part in this shipper roundtable.

 

For more information, please contact Brittany Wynne at brittany.wynne@ihsmarkit.com

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Roundtable Leader

Bill Mongelluzzo

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Roundtable Leader

Mark Szakonyi

Sponsored by:

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.