google-site-verification=LFA_YQpd4c3RbgBEFteDthZ6ahdOBWxuhZJQbie5V0Y Port Performance North America | Agenda Day 1

Tuesday, 10 December 2019

7:30 AM — 5:00 PM

Registration

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

8:30 — 8:45 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Salon AB

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Bill Mongelluzzo

8:45 — 9:30 AM

Keynote Address:
The Challenges Facing Terminal Operators

Location: Salon AB

Container terminal operators in North America are at the fulcrum of international supply chains, where ocean carriers meet truck and rail operators. Although their business relationships are with the liner companies, terminal operators also serve motor carriers, intermodal railroads, equipment providers, and ultimately, BCOs. Their challenges begin with late vessel arrivals. On-time performance at North American ports this past year dropped as low as 40 percent, according to Copenhagen-based consultant and shipping analyst Sea-Intelligence. How are terminal operators responding to consistently late vessel arrivals to ensure containers are delivered to BCOs and truckers on time? What demands will ocean carriers, BCOs, and truckers place on North American ports and terminal operators in the coming years as they handle larger vessels cascaded from Asia-Europe to the trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic trades? Will North American ports be able to handle container exchanges of 10,000 or greater from mega-ships? Wim Lagaay, CEO of APM Terminals North America, will set the stage for the 2019 Port Performance North America Conference with his analysis of the challenges facing terminal operators.

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Bill Mongelluzzo

President & CEO,
APM Terminals North America

Keynote Speaker

Wim Lagaay

9:30 — 10:30 AM

The Economic and Container Shipping Outlook:
What It Means for North American Ports

Location: Salon AB

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Director, Transportation Consulting, Economics and Country Risk, IHS Markit

Panelist

Paul Bingham

Senior Vice President,
Trade and Sales,
Hyundai Merchant Marine

Panelist

Lawrence Burns

Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Turloch Mooney

The fundamentals of container shipping may be improving, but the industry is hardly out of the woods, as the outlook for demand weakens and carriers grapple with higher operating costs tied to the low-sulfur global mandate. Maritime research firm Alphaliner expects global container capacity in 2020 to expand 3.3 percent while demand will grow 3.1 percent, compared with 2019 increases of 3.6 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively. But demand is fluid, particularly as the US-China trade war takes steady US economic growth down a notch, prompting Drewry Shipping Consultants in early October to downgrade its demand outlook for 2019 to 2.6 percent from 3 percent. This session will offer forward-looking analysis of the US and global economies, how they connect to containerized trade in 2020 and beyond, and what it all means in terms of port fluidity through North American ports. 

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

11:00 AM — 11:45 AM

Chassis I:
Minimizing Disruption Through Collaboration

Location: Salon AB

Intermodal equipment providers have a rather straightforward mission: Have the right amount of chassis at the right locations at the right time. The international supply chain, however, faces so many interruptions — from weather events and consistently late vessel arrivals to peak-season spikes in volumes and excessive retention of chassis at warehouses by large BCOs — that it’s becoming almost impossible to predict a terminal’s chassis from day to day. Furthermore, motor carriers’ demands for “trucker choice” in determining which chassis they wish to use adds additional complexity to the chassis regime. Two of the largest US port complexes, Los Angeles-Long Beach with its pool of pools and the South Atlantic ports, have made progress this past year in developing solutions, but chassis shortages and dislocations are still a problem. How are these ports, and the truckers and BCOs they serve, collaborating to improve their particular chassis regimes?

Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Deputy Executive Director,
Port of Long Beach

Panelist

Dr. Noel Hacegaba

President and CEO,

RoadOne IntermodaLogistics

Panelist

Ken Kellaway

Vice President,
CMI West,
CMI Transportation

Panelist

Robert Loya

Chief Operating Officer,

Georgia Ports Authority

Panelist

Edward McCarthy

Chief Operating Officer, South Carolina Ports Authority

Panelist

Barbara L. Melvin

Sponsored by:

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11:45 AM — 12:30 PM

Chassis II:
The IEP View of Solving the Equipment Challenge

Location: Salon AB

Every seaport and intermodal rail hub has a different operating environment with its own complexities, making intermodal equipment providers’ job uniquely challenging. Los Angeles-Long Beach, with 12 marine terminals served by three ocean carrier alliances, is a landlord port like New York-New Jersey with its growing fleet of trucker-owned chassis. The operating ports of Savannah and Charleston have attempted to form a single gray chassis pool and a neutral manager, but that project is on hold. Inland hubs such as Chicago, Memphis, and Dallas-Fort Worth grapple with the railroads’ differing operational models of stacked vs. grounded containers. With no single solution in sight for all of these facilities, top executives from the three major IEPs will discuss the challenges they face, and their preferred solutions, to address these issues.

Associate Editor, JOC,

Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Ari Ashe

President and CEO,
TRAC Intermodal

Panelist

Jennifer Polli

CEO,
American Intermodal Management

Panelist

Nathaniel Seeds

CEO,
DCLI

Panelist

William J. Shea

President and
Chief Operating Officer,
Flexi-Van

Panelist

Charles Wellins

CEO,
Consolidated Chassis Management

Panelist

Mike Wilson

12:30 — 1:30 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Salon CD

1:30  — 2:30 PM

It All Starts With the Terminal:
What Ports Are Doing to Improve Cargo Flow for Customers

Location: Salon AB

Associate Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Ari Ashe

Vice President,
Operations,
Montreal Port Authority

Panelist

Daniel Dagenais

Chief Operations Officer,
Virginia International Terminals

Panelist

Kevin Price

Director, Planning
and Technology,
Port Houston

Panelist

Mike Shaffner

Recognizing the crucial role they play in the international supply chain, ports and marine terminals are taking creative steps to improve cargo fluidity, ensure equipment availability, and streamline the handoff of containers among the transportation modes. The role of facilitator is becoming increasingly complex as vessel sizes increase and container exchanges lengthen. Ports’ strategies include process improvements such as container dray-offs and appointment systems for truckers. Technology advancements allow ports and terminal operators to be the trusted portal through which information is shared electronically among all members of the supply chain in a secure environment. In this highly anticipated session, representatives of East, Gulf, and Canadian ports will discuss what they are doing to improve port performance, and port users will talk about how they benefit from these efforts, and what remains to be done. 

2:30  — 3:00 PM

Networking Break

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

3:00  — 4:00 PM

Port Call Optimization:
From Concept to Reality

Location: Salon AB

Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Turloch Mooney

President and CEO,

Harbor Trucking Association, President and CEO,

Ventures 52

Panelist

Weston LaBar

Executive Director,

Port of Los Angeles

Panelist

Gene Seroka

The debate over greenhouse gas emissions has brought the topic of port call optimization to the forefront of global maritime policy. An International Maritime Organization resolution adopted in May encourages cooperation among ports and shipping companies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from ships, and optimization of port calls is highlighted as one of four key areas of focus. The concept is essentially about improving oceanside port efficiency through standardization of port call processes, improving stakeholder communication and data exchange. The goal is for vessels to spend less time in port and to facilitate just-in-time vessel arrivals. This panel will explore the issues around port call optimization in container shipping. It will discuss such challenges as developing data standards and encouraging the exchange of key operational data among stakeholders to facilitate improved port productivity and other conditions for achieving just-in-time vessel arrivals in the global container shipping network.

4:00  — 5:00 PM

Port Innovation:
Bridging the Communication Gap

Location: Salon AB

Vice President,
 Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

Founder & CEO of

PortPro Technologies,
Axle Technologies

Panelist

Michael Mecca

Vice President
of Information Technology,
The Triangle Group

Panelist

Eric Lenzen

Container ports are traditionally where shippers and their representative parties butt their collective heads against walls. However, more than even delayed vessel arrivals, lack of in-transit cargo visibility, and tight capacity, the lack of continuity between ocean and landside operations, and what goes within the terminals, can create efficiencies that result in costs related to demurrage, detention, delays, and information black holes Technology can solve these issues, but the tricky challenge is that each port cluster tends to act independently, with different ecosystems building separate solutions to account for the differing characteristics of each region. What approaches can be scaled effectively across regions? What specific technologies are changing the way parties interact to drive more cargo fluidity, visibility, and connectivity through ports? This session will address these questions, and more.

5:00 — 6:30 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.